Health

Blood levels of proteins reflect the starting, stopping, and changing of biological processes linked to aging. We make significant changes at three ages.

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Photo by Vidar Nordli-Mathisen on Unsplash

“The wiser mind mourns less for what age takes away than what it leaves behind.”

This is the insightful observation of William Wordsworth (1770–1850), the English romantic who (along with Samuel Taylor Coleridge) helped initiate the Romantic Age in English literature. Together, they published Lyrical Ballads in 1798.

Today is not a day for literature. Instead, I want to share with you the remarkable findings of researchers from Stanford University. They looked at almost 3,000 proteins in the blood of 4,263 subjects ages 18 to 95. Here’s what they discovered:

  • 1,379 proteins changed with an individual’s age
  • Using information from only 373 proteins, the researchers could predict a subject’s age with great accuracy. Using just nine proteins allowed for a reasonably good prediction. …


Fitness

Short bursts of exercise induce changes in your body’s metabolites that correlate with long-term health.

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Photo by Nattu Adnan on Unsplash

Regular physical activity has innumerable benefits. Do you want to lower your risk of heart disease and stroke? Physical activity may be a good way to do so. High blood pressure, obesity, diabetes risk reduction, and more? Yep, exercise.

Recently, I have thought a lot about exercise intensity. At 57 years old, I am beginning to have a slower recovery from my high-intensity interval workouts. I need to shift my approach to physical activity, even as I remain fit. …


Fitness

I do these two workouts to slow aging at a cellular level.

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Photo by Todd Diemer on Unsplash

Physical activity promotes health. But not all exercise is created equally. What I mean is that different types have varying anti-aging effects. Today we examine the two forms of exercise that may help you to slow your telomere shortening, and in turn, live longer.

A recent study provides some data pointing to two forms of exercise as the best for slowing telomere shortening. Today, we take a quick peek at telomeres and aging before moving to a new study recently published in the European Heart Journal.

Aging: Role of telomeres

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Photo by National Cancer Institute on Unsplash

The terminal ends of our linear chromosomes have been under scientific study since the early twentieth century. Three scientists studying telomeres won The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 2009. …


Fitness

Do you run recreationally? Today we look at running-associated knee injuries.

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Photo by Alexandr Podvalny on Unsplash

Running is a fabulous exercise form, and can provide physical and mental health benefits for many individuals. Unfortunately, running can result in knee injuries. Such harm can be the result of overuse, wear, and tear, or changes to your running routine. If you suffer from such an injury, you may wonder:

  • Will I be able to continue running?
  • How can I prevent this from reoccurring?

Let’s look at the consequences and prognostic factors of running-related knee injuries among recreational runners.

A study recently published in the Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine is part of a randomized clinical trial on running injury prevention among recreational runners. At baseline (during registration for a running event), researchers collected demographic and training variables. …


Health

New research links cardiorespiratory fitness and muscle strength with mental health.

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Photo by Tim Mossholder on Unsplash

Anxiety and depression are strikingly common. The evidence points to a combination of genetic, biological, environmental, and psychological factors that influence such conditions. While depression can manifest at any age, it often starts in adulthood. Still, we increasingly recognize that young children and adolescents can suffer from anxiety or depression. Here are some sobering statistics for individuals in the United States:

  • Generalized Anxiety Disorder. GAD affects nearly seven million adults, or about 3 percent of the population. Females have double the risk of men. This condition often occurs along with major depression.
  • Panic disorder. PD affects six million adults or just under 3 percent of the population. …


Fitness

Exercise and calorie burn. And a bit about the afterburn following vigorous exercise.

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Running burns more calories, but at what cost? Photo by SwapnIl Dwivedi on Unsplash

Honestly, any movement can provide health benefits. It seems intuitive that running would be better than walking. But is this really true? Does the fact that more calories are burned through running make it the preferred approach? On the other hand, walking seems relatively easy. However, I have designed walking programs for myself that are rigorous and not easy. Today we explore the relative merits and demerits of walking versus running in terms of weight loss.

Weight loss: Run or walk?

It seems intuitively obvious that running burns more calories per minute than does walking. On the other hand, you may have challenges keeping up a higher intensity for a long period of time. …


Technology

A watch-based program can detect and disrupt nightmares for those with PTSD or nightmare disorder.

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Photo by Glen Hodson on Unsplash

Got nightmares? The US Food and Drug Administration recently gave marketing authorization to an Apple Watch app to detect and disrupt adults' nightmares with either post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Let’s look at how the NightWare system does its work.

Creating a unique sleep profile

The NightWare system creates an algorithm to build a unique sleep profile for an individual. Body movement changes and heart rate help in the creation of the profile. The Apple Watch does the monitoring and then sends the information to the manufacturer’s server

The computer then determines if a person is experiencing a nightmare. The watch responds by vibrating and thus interrupting the nightmare. The sleeping person does not usually fully awaken. Sleepwalkers are not candidates for the approach, nor or those who do violence during nightmares. …


Health

Collecting and analyzing earwax for levels of the stress hormone cortisol may help us track mental health.

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Photo by kyle smith on Unsplash

How stressed are you? We all experience it on occasion. Stress may occur as an acute, one-time event. Alternatively, it can happen repetitively over a more extended period. No matter what type, stress is associated with physical and mental health risks. Some of us may cope with stress more effectively and recover from stressful events more rapidly than others.

Examples of stress include:

  • routine stress associated with work, family, school, or other responsibilities related to our activities of daily living
  • acute stress, such as related to the loss of a job
  • traumatic stress, such as experienced during a war, natural disaster, assault, or a significant accident. …


The bizarre story of human temperatures dropping over the last couple of decades.

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Humans have seen our temperatures drop over time. Photo by Markus Spiske on Unsplash

Every day, my hospital mandates that I check my temperature twice daily. I also need to report any symptoms I am experiencing that might be related to Covid-19. Folks coming into my medical center hear innumerable questions about symptoms and have their temperatures checked, too.

Today we look at the bizarre story of ourselves. We humans have been dropping our body temperatures over the last couple of decades. But first, please indulge me as I share four of my top picks of wintry films:

  1. Doctor Zhivago. This 1965 epic take on the Russian Revolution puts winter on steroids. …


Health

Learn about the stress and heart disease connection.

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Photo by Gift Habeshaw on Unsplash

Each of us experiences stress in our daily lives. It can be secondary to having an illness or not getting enough sleep. We have emotional stress, such as from not having enough money or the death of a loved one. And then there are the day-to-day stresses of work, interpersonal relationships, and more. You are stuck in traffic, late for work. Your breathing rate increases, your heart races, and your muscles tense up.

You are experiencing the well-known “fight or flight response.” When you and I experience stress, our bodies experience a surge in chemicals such as cortisol and adrenaline (epinephrine), preparing our bodies for action. Is that car in front of you moving too slowly? If it burst into flames, you would be ready to flee from the scene. …

About

Michael Hunter MD

I have degrees from Harvard, Yale, and Penn. I am a radiation oncologist in the Seattle area. You may find me regularly posting at www.newcancerinfo.com

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